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Breeding of Lysmata wurdemanni (Peppermint shrimp)

Discussion in 'Livestock Breeding' started by hma, Nov 9, 2007.

  1. hma

    hma New Member

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    Breeding of Lysmata wurdemanni (Peppermint shrimp)
    Report of experience for Reefsanctury by Heinz Mahler (HMA)​



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    Introduction

    I do not know what you thinking about that? You read on the Internet or books and magazines an interesting report on the breeding of Lysmata wundermanni. While I noticed that in almost all the articles and reports most crucial one last detail for a successful Breeding concealed. Well, what else remains as it to find out. I am trying it for some years on different ways, today I write something about my first success. Even though my current success rate is just under 1%, but this appears in almost all private breeds yet to be comparable, it just encourages me to continue to improve the rate.

    If you like to improve the success rate, I think it is essential to increase the exchange of ideas between the various private breeders. Both the successes and the failures should be discussed in the longer term to the private breeding to optimize and improve and to the removal of animals from the oceans more and more to reduce or even a whole day to be able to conclude.



    The breeding

    As the larvae of Lysmata wundermanni after hatching much more developed than comparable species, the breeding is also somewhat easier than for example Lysmata amboinensis. The larval stage of the "peppermint" is significantly shorter than that of other similar species known, another advantage of breeding the “peppermint”. Despite these facts, I reach up to a survival rate of just under 1% for a considerable amount of care. For commercial use my method is not useful, the success rate is just too low. Nevertheless, I think it is for an experienced Reefer interesting to try breeding.


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    (Peppermint shrimp larvae 2 days old)



    Trapping the larvae

    The parents are in a small aquarium (55gal) without further animals. The larvae hatch out shortly after the lights went out and with a small spotlight in a corner of the aquarium lured. To capture the larvae I use a sieve as with plankton reactors will be delivered. The larvae are brought directly into the water of the raising aquarium (2gal). Despite this rather rough method all larvae survived the procedure.


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    (Larvae 2 weeks old)​




    Breeding tank (2gal)

    The breeding aquarium consists of two parts. A larger part for the larvae and a smaller part for the filtering of the water. Here are the drain pipes and a small sponge (must be cleaned daily). The two parts are separated with an appropriate grid. A small pump in the tank of the parents is used to pump the water in the breeding tank. From there it runs through a drain pipe and a small sponge back in the aquarium of the parents and will there be filtered. This method requires no additional filter or skimmer and reaches an optimal environment for the larvae. Due to the slightly elevated location of the breeding tank occurs at the end a good flow, a almost all detrius are back rinsed in the tank of the parents.


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    (Larvae 3 month old)​




    Food

    The larvae eat already from the beginning Brachionus plicatilis. After 2-3 days, the stalk eyes of the larvae can be detected, I feed the larvae very young Artemia-Nauplien, enriched with Phytoplankton (Nannochloropsis sp.). Instead of phytoplankton can be enriched with Culture Selco 3000. After a few more days the larvae eat already Nauplien which are slightly bigger. From about 2 weeks, I also feed with crushed frozen food like baby mysis etc., after two weeks they eat also very fine flakes. The feeding interval is about 2-3 hours, 4 -5 times a day. The flakes as well as Artemia Nauplien are enriched additionaly with Lipovit (Trans Marine).
     
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  2. vdituri

    vdituri New Member

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    Thank You Heinz! Great info indeed!

    It sounds like these would be the best type of shrimp to start with because of the shortened larvae stage and the advanced stage right after birth.

    Thank you again for posting this and putting together all these pictures and sketches. Great thread.

    I truly believe this is where the future of our hobby should be, in the research of captive breeding stock so as to not tax our oceans.
     
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  3. ScubaDrew

    ScubaDrew New Member

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    Thank you HMA! This is so interesting, I'm thinking about using my spare bedroom as as area to setup a second tank and use your diagram above to setup the breeding addition.

    Appreciate the info and sharing your experience!

    Drew
     
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  4. Dentoid

    Dentoid Smile Maker
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    That's great Heinz! You're the peppermint daddy!:lol:
     
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  5. sasquatch

    sasquatch Brunt of all Jokes~
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    Heinz! wonderful! what are you doing for light? In the asian shrimp culture market they use grape caulerpa for breeding, both for nitrate, heavy metal reduction and habitat, best of success Ill be lurking with optimism lol. Steve
     
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  6. Jason25

    Jason25 New Member

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    Very interesting to read HMA keep up the good work and best of luck to you and your shrimp.
     
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  7. Melanie

    Melanie New Member

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    Great information! Thank you for sharing your success.
     
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  8. JFK_Jr

    JFK_Jr New Member
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    Very nice Heinz... Thank you!

    I absolutely love peppermint shrimp... in my book, they are a must have for my reef tank.
     
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    Last edited: Nov 9, 2007
  9. hma

    hma New Member

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    First of all, thank you for the nice comments. Unfortunately I forget one thing in my report, before the breeding of any type of shrimp or fish starts, you must breed successful zoo- and phytoplankton.

    @vdituri
    thanks victor...... yes, peppermints are ideal for a first attempt.

    @sasquatch
    Lighting is a T5 (4x24Watt) over both tanks. In the 55gal tank is 20Kg LR, 20Kg Live sand, and four different algae species.
     
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  10. Craig Manoukian

    Craig Manoukian New Member

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    Fabulous project Heinz!
     
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