EXACTLY how much salt in every 5 gallon of water

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by TheSaltySpitoon, May 24, 2008.

  1. TheSaltySpitoon

    TheSaltySpitoon New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Rochester NY
    trying to make this easier on me here umm finally got my rodi unit installed and making water now as i speak. but i am using 5 gallon buckets. and was wondering if anyone knew how much salt i would need EXACTLY how much salt i would need for every 5 gallon bucket of water. any one know?
     
    #1
  2. BarbMazz

    BarbMazz New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Messages:
    4,093
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    Near Cleveland, Ohio
    I think it depends on the brand of salt you use. I use Reef Crystals, and 2-1/2 cups will make 5 gallons of water to a salinity of 1.021, which is too low for a reef tank. So, I had to use more than that 1-1/2c p/5g, but I don't know exactly how much more.
     
    #2
    Last edited: May 24, 2008
  3. prow

    prow New Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2005
    Messages:
    4,725
    Likes Received:
    169
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, CA
    depends on the salt and what salinity you will be mixing to.
     
    #3
  4. lcstorc

    lcstorc New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2006
    Messages:
    27,551
    Likes Received:
    763
    Location:
    Cocoa Fl
    maybe i just goofed. i'll se in a bie since i am mixing 65g now
     
    #4
  5. prow

    prow New Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2005
    Messages:
    4,725
    Likes Received:
    169
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, CA
    lol, you bet me to it. i too use RC and use about 3-4 cups, ~~ish, to mix 5gal to sal of 1.026.
     
    #5
  6. goldenmean

    goldenmean New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Messages:
    4,727
    Likes Received:
    156
    Location:
    Chicago
    I use BioSea.
    2.5 cups per 5g = 1.026 or 1/2 cup per gallon
     
    #6
  7. panmanmatt

    panmanmatt New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Messages:
    2,293
    Likes Received:
    54
    Location:
    Waretown, NJ
    Most of your salt mixes use a ratio of 1/2 cup f salt per gallon of water. Start with that and tweak it to meet your needs.
     
    #7
  8. sasquatch

    sasquatch Brunt of all Jokes~
    PREMIUM

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    12,623
    Likes Received:
    575
    Location:
    the very farthest west coast of canada
    just for sillies sake what about temperature and atmospheric pressure ??
     
    #8
  9. BobBursek

    BobBursek New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,844
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Germantown, WI Milw area suburb
    Miniscue effects, unless testing with Lab quality insturments, you would not see a difference. Temp may have the most effect do to colder water is more dense. Water is at it's denses at 39*F, warmer or colder then that it is less dense, that is why ice floats, and lakes "turn over" 2 times a year in climates that have seasonal temps.
     
    #9
  10. tbittner

    tbittner New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Messages:
    5,562
    Likes Received:
    79
    Location:
    Northern VA
    I read an article that said a 10 degree difference in temp can cause a difference in reading with a refractometer of .003.

    That's more than miniscue...
     
    #10
    1 person likes this.
  11. sasquatch

    sasquatch Brunt of all Jokes~
    PREMIUM

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    12,623
    Likes Received:
    575
    Location:
    the very farthest west coast of canada
    We could start a new game and become famous "Trivial Pursuit REEFING EDITION"

    Temperature Compensation Makes The Difference!

    Temperature is one of the single most important factors influencing accurate refractometer readings and is one of the largest sources of error in measurement. Refractive index is VERY dependent on temperature. It is well known that substantially all materials expand when heated (become less dense) and contract when cooled (become more dense). The speed of light in a liquid increases with temperature, and the refractive index, therefore, decreases.
    Comparison Graph Showing MISCO Refractometers are Automatically Temperature Compensated

    The amount of error per degree Celsius is different for every fluid and differs for different concentrations of the same fluid.

    Temperature compensation relieves the user of the responsibility to measure temperature and apply a correction factor when taking readings. Temperature Compensation Makes The Difference!

    The chart compares a temperature compensated MISCO Refractometer (red) to a non-compensated competitor (blue). It is plain to see that at 20 'C (68 'F) they are both correct; however, as the temperature deviates from 20 'C, there is a marked error in the non-compensated instrument.
     
    #11
  12. kathywithbirds

    kathywithbirds New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Messages:
    6,043
    Likes Received:
    140
    Location:
    Uppityville, MD
    I always go for 1.022 for initial mixing. RC and IO use 1/2 cup per gallon, roughly, then I add a touch of calcium additive and Ph perfect (something like that) and let it churn for a day or so. Test the salinity and I generally wind up with 1.022 to 1.024. I can add a pinch of salt if I've topped off recently or keep it there if I haven't (called lazy reefer syndrome.)

    I got this other mix I'm trying that I forget the name of and the 1/2 cup isn't enough. I'll try and fish up the name.
     
    #12
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Converting from Saltwater to Freshwater - Not exactly throwing in the towel... General Reef Aquarium Discussion Apr 24, 2014
what exactly do freshwater plants do? Fresh Water Forum Nov 19, 2012
How exactly to ship,and sell corals General Reef Aquarium Discussion Apr 23, 2010
Not exactly a HH but what is it? Reef Hitchhiker ID Nov 18, 2009
this is exactly why i love dogs Off-Topic Oct 27, 2008

Share This Page